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Hidden Nob Hill home, asking $18.9 million, is one of SF’s most expensive

October 18, 2019

Hidden Nob Hill home, asking $18.9 million, is one of SF’s most expensive

Concealed by a nondescript perimeter wall on Washington Street, you won’t see this multimillion dollar home hoofing it from Chinatown to Nob Hill. Located up a hidden driveway and behind a gate sits the circa-1914 gem, which is on National Trust for Historic Preservation, seeking a cool $18,950,000.

The Historic Boggs-Shenson House (the house is named after Angus G. and Mae H. Boggs and the physician brothers Ben and A. Jess Shenson) features five stories, five bedrooms, five bathrooms, and 4,191 square feet. It’s one of a very few single-family homes in the tony neighborhood primarily made up of condos and apartment buildings.

The facade is that of the brown shingled variety, which works nicely here. The grounds are large and impressive, especially when one considers that fact that it’s smack dab in the middle of a densely populated neighborhood.

The property also comes with the types of amenities the elite adore—rooftop deck, Zen garden, wine room, putting green (the higher tax bracket’s unyielding love of golf will never fail to bewilder), and views galore.

Being on the National Trust for Historic Preservation means that the owner cannot change the house too much—i.e., no demolition and no antiseptic cookie-cutter replacement home. (Sorry, tech ilk.) Which isn’t to say the house should never be brought up to date. In fact, this home benefitted from a fairly recent interior refresh that manages to keeps the abode’s integrity intact.

And while we don’t normally recommend looking at realtor videos, do check out the film for this house. The intro exterior shot, featuring the driveway and gate, is a thrill.

Ranking-wise, 1266 Washington lists as the fifth most expensive home in San Francisco right now behind 2626 Larkin ($25 million), 2820 Scott ($29.5 million), 2900 Vallejo ($30 million), and 181 Fremont’s grand penthouse ($42 million).

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